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  By Erica Marcuserica.marcus@newsday.com  @Erica_MarcusUpdated August 22, 2018 8:00 AMPRINT SHARE 

In a town overflowing with sushi bars (12 and counting) Shoshaku is poised to make waves in Great Neck. The small storefront, which took over the old Mizu, specializes in fish flown in from Japan. On a recent evening, the winged fish included sturgeon, gray mullet, baby yellowtail, mahi mahi and chu-toro (the fatty — but not the fattiest — part of the bluefin tuna’s belly). Most selections were priced at $5 per piece.

Shoshaku serves its share of nutty rolls, such as the Triple Crown (containing white tuna, pepper tuna and avocado and topped with spicy tuna) but the emphasis seems to be on the higher end of the sushi spectrum. The Japanese imports plus other hopping-fresh cuts (including monkfish liver and real king crab) are also available as part of the omakase, defined on the menu as a $68  “no brainer chef’s premium selection sushi.” Regular sushi and sashimi platters are $19 to $25.

Among the donburi (over-rice) bowls, are some more rarities: kaisen don ($28, like chirashi, but with regular, not vinegared, rice), oyako don ($13, chicken braised with egg and onion) and something called a garlic-oyster bowl ($15). Not so rare: a tuna-salmon poke bowl ($14).

There are teishoku (set-menu) dinners, a few noodles and plenty of hot and cold starters.

Shoshaku Enters The Sushi Scene

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By

Noah Sheidlower 

A food very familiar to frequent Great Neck diners, sushi can be found on nearly every block of the village, each restaurant approaching this Japanese delicacy from a different angle. This upsurge of creativity has led all of the sushi bars on the peninsula to compete with one another, leading many to close.

Great Neck’s newest addition to the sushi scene, Shoshaku, on 68 Middle Neck Rd. in Mizu’s former location, approaches sushi from a much more professional and modern way than most of its competitors, greatly emphasizing quality fish while, at the same time, creating new sushi rolls prepared using both traditional and contemporary cooking techniques.

The eatery’s decor is a touch more upscale than its predecessor. The dining room is much brighter and the overall ambiance is more state-of-the-art. From polished wood floors and tables to contemporary metal chairs to fresh plants scattered throughout, a great level of attention is devoted to each detail in the restaurant.

Nice additions to the already modernized space are new light fixtures supported by a stylish black metal structure hanging about the sushi bar and a small wine bar accompanied by cute Japanese cat figurines.

Prices are rather typical for Great Neck sushi bars, with appetizers ranging from $5 for simple edamame to $14 for beef tataki, sushi rolls from $5 for yellowtail and salmon rolls to $22 for a king crab and wagyu roll and entrées from $9 for kale noodles to $28 for a high-quality sashimi rice bowl.

Many of the cold appetizers parallel those of other sushi eateries, like a delicious yellowtail carpaccio with chives and lemon or spicy tuna tartare. An exception to the norm is Holy Grenade, in which avocado is positioned in a way that houses spicy tuna inside and is served alongside homemade veggie chips.

The small-plates selection resembles that of an upscale sushi bar in Japan, featuring more traditional options, such as grilled mackerel, grilled whole squid, deep-fried baby octopus and yuzu pepper scallops. For non-seafood starters, try avocado and king oyster mushroom or zucchini itame (stir fry).

The selection of sushi stands out from other competitors in that many traditional sushi rolls are almost reinvented to better reflect changing food trends. While classics, like a salmon avocado or chicken tempura rolls, are popular, other nonconventional rolls like the Day Dreamer with cajun-spice yellowtail or Triple Crown with white tuna, pepper tuna and spicy tuna shine, the combination of ingredients working together harmoniously to produce a cohesive roll.

        

A food very familiar to frequent Great Neck diners, sushi can be found on nearly every block of the village, each restaurant approaching this Japanese delicacy from a different angle. This upsurge of creativity has led all of the sushi bars on the peninsula to compete with one another, leading many to close.

Great Neck’s newest addition to the sushi scene, Shoshaku, on 68 Middle Neck Rd. in Mizu’s former location, approaches sushi from a much more professional and modern way than most of its competitors, greatly emphasizing quality fish while, at the same time, creating new sushi rolls prepared using both traditional and contemporary cooking techniques.

The eatery’s decor is a touch more upscale than its predecessor. The dining room is much brighter and the overall ambiance is more state-of-the-art. From polished wood floors and tables to contemporary metal chairs to fresh plants scattered throughout, a great level of attention is devoted to each detail in the restaurant.

Nice additions to the already modernized space are new light fixtures supported by a stylish black metal structure hanging about the sushi bar and a small wine bar accompanied by cute Japanese cat figurines.

Prices are rather typical for Great Neck sushi bars, with appetizers ranging from $5 for simple edamame to $14 for beef tataki, sushi rolls from $5 for yellowtail and salmon rolls to $22 for a king crab and wagyu roll and entrées from $9 for kale noodles to $28 for a high-quality sashimi rice bowl.

Many of the cold appetizers parallel those of other sushi eateries, like a delicious yellowtail carpaccio with chives and lemon or spicy tuna tartare. An exception to the norm is Holy Grenade, in which avocado is positioned in a way that houses spicy tuna inside and is served alongside homemade veggie chips.

The small-plates selection resembles that of an upscale sushi bar in Japan, featuring more traditional options, such as grilled mackerel, grilled whole squid, deep-fried baby octopus and yuzu pepper scallops. For non-seafood starters, try avocado and king oyster mushroom or zucchini itame (stir fry).

The selection of sushi stands out from other competitors in that many traditional sushi rolls are almost reinvented to better reflect changing food trends. While classics, like a salmon avocado or chicken tempura rolls, are popular, other nonconventional rolls like the Day Dreamer with cajun-spice yellowtail or Triple Crown with white tuna, pepper tuna and spicy tuna shine, the combination of ingredients working together harmoniously to produce a cohesive roll.

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SHOSHAKU

Address : 68 Middle Neck Road, Great Neck, New York 11021, United States

Tel : (518) 930-7353

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